Categories
General

New donations to our bookshelf (Jan 2012)

This month we’ve got some notable new books for members to read in Nottingham Hackspace.  The classic ‘Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain: A Course in Enhancing Creativity and Artistic Confidence’ by Betty Edwards claims to be the world’s most widely used drawing instruction book and has cracking reviews. We also have a brand new book, ‘How Round Is Your Circle?: Where Engineering and Mathematics Meet’ by John Bryant, which describes some beautiful physical models you can build to explore mathematical problems from an engineering perspective.

These donations were made by David Hayward (and by me). If you have any interesting books gathering dust on your home bookshelf, please consider lending or donating them to the hackspace. I will leave you with these descriptions of our new books, from their publishers:

Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain (front cover)“Whether you feel you have little talent and you doubt you could ever learn, or you enjoy drawing but have not been able to get much beyond a childlike level, this book will give you the skill you have always wanted. If you are already drawing as a professional artist or artist-in-training, it will give you greater confidence in your ability and deepen your artistic perception. This 20th-anniversary edition of ‘Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain’ has been dramatically revised, with more than fifty per cent new material, including: Recent developments in brain research that relate to drawing. New insights on the use of drawing techniques in the corporate world and education. Instruction on self-expression through drawing. Ways to step beyond black-and-white drawing into colour. Detailed advice on applying the five basic skills of drawing to solve problems.”


How Round Is Your Circle (front cover)How do you draw a straight line? How do you determine if a circle is really round? These may sound like simple or even trivial mathematical problems, but to an engineer the answers can mean the difference between success and failure. How Round Is Your Circle? invites readers to explore many of the same fundamental questions that working engineers deal with every day–it’s challenging, hands-on, and fun.

John Bryant and Chris Sangwin illustrate how physical models are created from abstract mathematical ones. Using elementary geometry and trigonometry, they guide readers through paper-and-pencil reconstructions of mathematical problems and show them how to construct actual physical models themselves–directions included. It’s an effective and entertaining way to explain how applied mathematics and engineering work together to solve problems, everything from keeping a piston aligned in its cylinder to ensuring that automotive driveshafts rotate smoothly. Intriguingly, checking the roundness of a manufactured object is trickier than one might think. When does the width of a saw blade affect an engineer’s calculations–or, for that matter, the width of a physical line? When does a measurement need to be exact and when will an approximation suffice? Bryant and Sangwin tackle questions like these and enliven their discussions with many fascinating highlights from engineering history. Generously illustrated, How Round Is Your Circle? reveals some of the hidden complexities in everyday things.

Categories
Events Group Project Workshops

Hack in the Park – Green’s Mill

Sneinton Festival Launch Picnic At The Mill

25 June
11am – 4pm

Free, Small charge for face painting

Bring a picnic and come along to the Sneinton Festival launch day. Kite making, Face painting, Viking games and crafts. This event launches a week of activities for Sneinton Festival. Look out for the festival programme for details.

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The Nottingham Hackspace will provide a Pin Hole Camera and Soldering table at the Sneinton Festival Launch at Green’s Mill Sneinton

As well as a quick soldering lesson on our Flashy  Badges (£2 each all tools and tuition provided take about 5 – 10 minutes).

We’ll be showing you how to make a Pin Hole Sunrise Camera.

What is a pinhole camera?

A pinhole camera is an empty container containing a sheet of light sendsitive paper. In the side, under some black tape, is a tiny hole, which forms and image like a lens.

A pinhole camera will take a photograph of the sun travelling across the sky for a period of up to 6 months! It captures the arc of the sun as it rises from spring until summer.

You’ll be shown how to make the camera and given all the parts you need!

Taking a photo

Find a position for the camera pointing south towards the Sun. Use a compass if you are not sure.  Choose a date to start, the Summer solstice for instance on the 21st June 2011.

Fix the camera sturdily in position. It needs to cope with the weather and with nature!

Sunrise Project Flickr Collection belonging to Knowle West Media Centre

 

 

Categories
Events Workshops

Arduino Sunday Mk. II

Following the popularity of our Arduino Sundae workshop last August we’ve decided to run another!

12:00pm Sunday 27th March 2011

This time the event will be for those with some experience as well as beginners.

Arduino 101 For Beginners – A beginners kit will be available as well as tuition on getting started with Micro-controllers. As well as group tuition, one-on-one help will be available from experienced teachers and hackers who can help you learn more!

Arduino 2.0 For Progressors – The new Hackerspace rooms and tools will be available to you as well as expert one-on-one help. You’ll be able to make progress with your project as well as discuss all things Arduino with experts and other enthusiasts in an environment ideally suited to rapid prototyping!

Cost:

Workshop Only – £20 Bring your own Arduino & other items

Workshop with Arduino Budget Kit – £40 kit includes the new Arduino Uno

Register your interest here or by emailing info@nottinghack.co.uk

Arduino Sundae power point presentation

Categories
Open Hack Night Workshops

How To Workshop: Make a Circuit Board

6:30pm 26th January 2011

Get the basics of PCB (Printed Circuit Board) manufacture from Nottinghack’s Matt Little (from our Soldering & Drawdio Workshops).

There are many processes and techniques for making a printed circuit board (PCB).
In this session Matt will guide you through his process for making PCBs

Matt uses a mixture of home-made and bought tools. He will highlight some of the problems and share some of the tips and tricks he’s uses.

You will get to create and keep a circuit board for a simple LED flashing circuit (components included).

The circuit board layout is made using the open source software called KiCad (for both Linux and Windows). If you have a (small) circuit you would like created then bring along your completed PCB design and we can make that with you!